The lecture on biodiversity at a UK university has been labelled a “toxic” and “inappropriate” by one of the university’s top conservation scientists.

Ross Scott was speaking at a lecture organised by the Natural History Museum at the University of Leeds.

The lecture is part of the UK’s new series of lectures about biodiversity, in which students are encouraged to make a contribution to a theme and submit a paper.

But Professor Scott was not alone in his criticism.

David Tredwell, a conservation biologist at the Natural England Museum in Oxford, described the lecture as a “terrible experience”.

“It is extremely inappropriate for a university lecturer to give a lecture on the role of human behaviour in changing the landscape of the planet,” Professor Tredman told BBC News.

“It’s not in line with the standards of a university.”

The lecture, entitled ‘Why is it that plants and animals can be more or less similar?’, was due to be held at the university on Friday.

Professor Scott’s lecture will be a part of a programme called “Invasive Species in Your Life”.

The lectures aim to provide an “educational experience” for students about the role that invasive species play in the environment.

In recent years, the BBC has highlighted how invasive species are a “critical threat” to the global environment.

“We have to be clear about the importance of biodiversity for the future of the world,” said Professor Scott.

‘It is a very dangerous lecture’ Professor Scott told BBC Radio Leeds that he had already received many death threats after he spoke about the lecture at the weekend. “

So I want to make sure that people who want to do a bit of research on these issues get the information that they need, and the information they need is in these lectures.”

‘It is a very dangerous lecture’ Professor Scott told BBC Radio Leeds that he had already received many death threats after he spoke about the lecture at the weekend.

“I was surprised that there are some people who have said, ‘You’re not welcome at the museum’,” he said.

“But I think I’ve already received a lot of death threats because people feel I’ve been speaking against them.”

‘They were all talking about it’ Some students are angry at the lecture and have criticised the organisers for the lecture being held on the campus.

“Students are upset that the lectures were being held, and that the lecture was being given,” said Dr Joanna Hodge, a lecturer in ecology at the universities.

‘A good lesson’ Prof Scott said he was “totally delighted” with the response to the lecture, and had hoped that the events would continue to draw students. “

What we need is for universities to get on board with the idea of this event being about biodiversity and not about climate change.”

‘A good lesson’ Prof Scott said he was “totally delighted” with the response to the lecture, and had hoped that the events would continue to draw students.

“There are some great opportunities here in the lecture series for the next generation of scientists and students to be able to learn a lot about biodiversity in the course of this lecture,” he said, adding that he hoped that more people would participate in the lectures.

“The lecture is very good for the students. “

To give a very good lesson to people who don’t know much about biodiversity would be really, really good.”

“The lecture is very good for the students.

It’s good for teaching them about biodiversity.

It was all about the students, it was all a good learning experience.”

But some students, who were in attendance, have criticised what they have described as the lecture’s “inhuman” nature.

“They were talking about the diversity of life on Earth,” said student Caroline Brown.

It made them look like they were trying to talk about biodiversity.” “

You can see in the video that they are trying to show that the diversity is increasing, but it’s all in the background.

It made them look like they were trying to talk about biodiversity.”

‘No one has ever said no’ Professor Hodge said she was “disappointed” that the event was being held in the UK, where it would have been impossible for the organisers to have planned it properly.

“One of the reasons why we’ve started this event is because of the environmental movement in the United Kingdom,” she said.

She added that while it was a good idea to bring together scientists from different disciplines, she believed that the speakers should not have been involved.

‘We need to protect the world’ The lecture was originally scheduled for January 10, but was postponed to February 13 due to safety concerns. “

This is about what we can learn from the diversity, and we can use that to help make the world a better place.”

‘We need to protect the world’ The lecture was originally scheduled for January 10, but was postponed to February 13 due to safety concerns.

Professor Tedwell said that the lecturer should have “refrained from having anything to do with