It’s time to put the ‘c’ in ‘censor’ once and for all.

That’s the idea behind the “I’m Not a Censor” campaign.

“There’s no such thing as a censor in Canada, but the phrase ‘I’m not a censor’ is a common one,” said Paul Leduc, a Canadian film and television historian who founded the campaign, which was launched in July.

Leduc told CBC News the phrase has “never been a word that’s been used to demean or diminish the work of Canadian filmmakers and filmmakers’ work.”

He said there are several reasons why “I am not a censor.”

First, “it’s a word with a history in Canada,” he said.

The campaign has been endorsed by filmmakers and performers across the country, including actress Marnie Lee, actor Jason Segel, and actor-comedian Ben Stiller. “

And that’s what the campaign is trying to reverse that.”

The campaign has been endorsed by filmmakers and performers across the country, including actress Marnie Lee, actor Jason Segel, and actor-comedian Ben Stiller.

“We’re all saying that we want to be part of this,” Leduc said.

The campaign also aims to raise awareness of a number of Canadian historical figures who have been censors and to encourage Canadians to speak up if they think they’ve been mistreated or harassed by a film director or producer.

Lengel also wants to highlight the impact that the film industry has had on Canadians, pointing to the recent film “The Last Word” and the “Oddly Enough” remake, which both received mixed reviews.

“They’re both very good films that reflect the importance of the film-making process,” Lengelsaid.

“The film industry, as an industry, has had a major impact on Canadian society in many different ways.

And that is something we’re trying to highlight in this campaign.”